Edward Snowden: 5 Years In Russia & Still Relevant As Ever

Authored by Seraphim Hanisch via TheDuran.com,

TASS reported that August 1 was the five year anniversary of Edward Snowden’s being granted temporary asylum in the Russian Federation.

This happened after his release of an enormous trove of information showing clandestine and illegal practices being carried out by the US intelligence agencies to gather information on just about anyone in the world, for any – or no – reason at all.

Edward Snowden, 35, is a computer security expert. In 2005-2008, he worked at the University of Maryland’s Center for Advanced Study of Language sponsored by the National Security Agency (NSA) and at the global communications division at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia. In 2007, Snowden was stationed with diplomatic cover at the US mission to the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland. In 2009, he resigned from the CIA to join the Dell company that sent him to Hawaii to work for the NSA’s information-sharing office. He was particularly employed with the Booz Allen Hamilton consulting firm.

In June 2013, Snowden leaked classified information to journalists Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, which revealed global surveillance programs run by US and British intelligence agencies. He explained the move by saying that he wanted to tell the world the truth because he believed such large-scale surveillance on innocent citizens was unacceptable and the public needed to know about it.

The Guardian and The Washington Post published the first documents concerning the US intelligence agencies’ spying on Internet users on June 6, 2013. According to the documents, major phone companies, including Verizon, AT&T and Sprint Nextel, handed records of their customers’ phone conversations over to the NSA and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), who also had direct access to the servers of Microsoft, Yahoo, Google, Facebook, Skype, YouTube, Paltalk, AOL and Apple. In addition, Snowden’s revelations showed that a secret program named PRISM was aimed at collecting audio and video recordings,photos, emails and information about users’ connections to various websites.

The next portion of revelations, which was published by the leading newspapers such as The Guardian, Brazil’s O Globo, Italy’s L’Espresso, Germany’s Der Spiegel and Suddeutsche Zeitung, concerned the US spying on politicians. In particular, it became known that the NSA and Great Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters intercepted the phone calls that foreign politicians and officials made during the G20 summit in London in 2009. British intelligence agencies particularly tried to intercept then Russian President Dmitry Medvedev’s phone calls. US intelligence monitored the phone calls of 35 world leaders, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

According to the disclosed information, the NSA regularly gathered intelligence at the New York and Washington offices of the European Union’s mission. The agency also achieved access to the United Nations’ internal video conferences and considers the Vienna headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as one of its major targets for spying.

The leaks also uncovered details about the Blarney and Rampart-T secret surveillance programs. Blarney, which started in 1978, is used to collect information related to counter-terrorism, foreign diplomats and governments, as well as economic and military targets. Rampart-T has been used since 1991 to spy on foreign leaders. The program is focused on 20 countries, including Russia and China.

Snowden also let the world know that Germany’s Federal Intelligence Service and Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution used the NSA’s XKeyScore secret computer system to spy on Internet users, monitoring their web activities. In addition, the NSA and Great Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters developed methods that allowed them to hack almost all the encryption systems currently used on the Internet. Besides, the leaked documents said that the NSA had secretly installed special software on about 100,000 computers around the globe that provided access to them and made cyber attacks easier.In particular, the NSA used a secret technology that made it possible to hack computers not connected to the Internet.

Portions of the information Snowden handed over to Greenwald and Poitras continue to be published on The Intercept website. According to edwardsnowden.com – a website commissioned by the Courage foundation (dedicated to building support for Snowden), a total of 2,176 documents from the archive have been published so far.

The NSA and the Pentagon claim that Snowden stole about 1.7 mln classified documents concerning the activities of US intelligence services and US military operations. He is charged with theft of government property, unauthorized communication of national defense information and willful communication of classified communications intelligence information to an unauthorized person. He is facing up to ten years in prison on each charge.

As can be seen, Mr. Snowden’s work is of extreme importance now in the connected Internet age.

But how is his life in Russia now?

According to Sputnik News, his life goes on. Reports say that he is continuing to learn the Russian language and to travel about the country:

Anatoly Kucherena, Edward Snowden’s lawyer, has revealed some details of the renowned whistleblower’s life to Sputnik. According to him, Snowden has found a job, is actively traveling around Russia and is continuing to learn the language.

Kucherena added that Snowden receives visits from his girlfriend, Lindsey Mills, and his parents. When asked about the whistleblower’s favorite place in Russia, his lawyer said that he likes St Petersburg “a lot.”

“He is doing alright: his girlfriend visits him, he has a good job and he’s continuing to study Russian. His parents visit him occasionally. [They] have no problems with visas. At least they have never complained about having any trouble,” the lawyer said.

After Snowden released classified NSA documents, he fled first to Hong Kong, then, on June 23, 2013, arrived in Moscow from Hong Kong. The whistleblower remained in the transit zone of Sheremetyevo Airport until he was granted temporary asylum in Russia, which was later prolonged to 2020.

As The Guardian wrote this week, Snowden’s disclosures are of historic importance and it is important that they remain accessible in order to generate insights far into the future. Today, Courage maintains the most comprehensive search engine for the published Snowden documents, the Snowden Doc Search, which we developed in partnership with Transparency Toolkit. Courage also maintains a complete chronological list of Snowden reporting, which will be continue to be updated for as long as documents from the Snowden archive continue to find their way into the public domain.

Some facts and figures from the Snowden archive

2176 documents have been published to date

41 publications and broadcasters around the world have produced original reporting based on newly released documents.

The number of documents published, by year:

2013 – 51

2014 – 264

2015 – 222

2016 – 720

2017 – 568

2018 – 351 so far

The vast majority of published documents (some 1985) come from the NSA, but there are also – 136 from GCHQ, 13 from Canada’s CSE, 5 from New Zealand’s GCSB and a couple from Australia’s ASD. Last month, a document from Japan’s secretive DFS, became the first from that agency ever to be published.

If you take the Anglophone Five Eyes countries out of the mix, the countries most often mentioned in the Snowden documents are Iraq (which is referred to in 299 separate documents), Afghanistan (157), China (129), Germany (126) and Pakistan (116).

The most frequently referenced codename by quite some way is XKeyScore, which goes to show how important this internal search tool for “nearly everything” is for NSA. Access to XKeyScore is an important resource for NSA’s international partners and reporting has shown that it has been made available to analysts in GermanySweden and Japan as well as the Five Eyes countries.

This just scratches the surface of what you can do with the Snowden Document Search and Courage’s other Snowden resources. 

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“I don’t want to live in a society that does these sort of things…”

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